Quick Answer: What Is The Difference Between A Breeder And A Puppy Mill?

Puppy mills are places where purebred or “designer” dogs are bred solely for the money they can bring in, with no regard for the dogs’ welfare.

The puppies are housed in overcrowded, unsanitary cages.

The breeding females produce one litter after another in cramped cages with no concern for their health.

How do you tell if a breeder is a puppy mill?

11 Signs a Puppy Is From a Puppy Mill

  • Poor Housing Conditions. Puppies ideally should be whelped and raised in a home environment.
  • Puppy Parents Are Unavailable. Source.
  • Multiple Litters.
  • Designer Breeds.
  • Lack of Medical Care.
  • Behavioral Problems.
  • “Dirty” Puppies.
  • Paperwork Not Required.

What defines a puppy mill?

According to the ASPCA, a puppy mill is a “large-scale commercial dog breeding operation where profit is given priority over the well-being of the dogs.” Puppies born in a puppy mill are often sold at as young as 8 weeks old, to brokers and/or retailers who then sell the puppies to the consumer.

How do I know if a dog breeder is reputable?

These are the 15 Signs that you’ve found a good breeder:

The parents will be on site, and you will be able to meet them, meeting the father may not be possible, but you should certainly meet the mother. There will be minimal numbers of litters from mom, and the number of litters available for adoption will be limited.

How do I make sure I am not buying from a puppy mill?

Here are some tips to avoid adopting from a puppy mill:

  1. Avoid pet stores, newspaper ads, and great deals online! Many puppy mills supply local pet stores with false information.
  2. Visit the breeder and ask questions! Ask to see the entire facility where the dogs are bred and kept.
  3. Adopt from a shelter or rescue instead!