Where Can I Find A Good Breeder?

Ask your vet, visit dog shows, or contact local breed clubs to get recommendations on good local dog breeders.

The American Kennel Club also offers breeder referrals for all the recognized breeds.

And of course, if you know anyone with a fabulous dog, ask where she got the pup.

How do I find a good breeder in my area?

16 Tips to Find Local Dog Breeders (and how to pick the right one)

  • Ask Your Veterinarian.
  • Ask Another Dog Owner.
  • Contact Local Dog Clubs.
  • Visit Local Dog Shows.
  • Check Out American Kennel Club.
  • Look at Pup Quest Website.
  • Search Online for Referrals.
  • Keep a List of Questions.

How do you know if a breeder is reputable?

These are the 15 Signs that you’ve found a good breeder:

The parents will be on site, and you will be able to meet them, meeting the father may not be possible, but you should certainly meet the mother. There will be minimal numbers of litters from mom, and the number of litters available for adoption will be limited.

How do you tell a good breeder from a bad breeder?

Here are the top 10 biggest warning signs you’re dealing with a bad breeder.

  1. They are selling the dogs for less than they are worth.
  2. They don’t make you sign a contract.
  3. They do not provide you with health and pedigree papers.
  4. They breed dogs who are too young or, too old or, they breed a female too many times.

What are reputable breeders?

Definition of a Reputable Breeder: A responsible breeder breeds to the standard, including the parts that address temperament, intelligence, and working ability. A responsible breeder breeds to improve the breed, and only to improve the breed and has no more litters than necessary to do so.

Are all breeders bad?

Bad Breeding Practices

No breeder is perfect but some breeders push the limits causing extensive health issues for the dogs they are breeding through bad breeding practices. This was a result of years of bad breeding practices so that now many of these animals are in constant pain.

How can you tell if its a puppy mill?

11 Signs a Puppy Is From a Puppy Mill

  • Poor Housing Conditions. Puppies ideally should be whelped and raised in a home environment.
  • Puppy Parents Are Unavailable. Source.
  • Multiple Litters.
  • Designer Breeds.
  • Lack of Medical Care.
  • Behavioral Problems.
  • “Dirty” Puppies.
  • Paperwork Not Required.

What should I look for when buying a dog from a breeder?

The Bottom Line—Buying from a Breeder Checklist

Never buy and ship online or meet somewhere the puppy doesn’t live. Visit the breeder on-site to see the conditions in which the puppy is living and meet the parents. Visit multiple times to learn the puppy’s personality and see if it’s a match for your needs.

What should I look for when buying a puppy from a breeder?

Some of the “right” answers are obvious (the vendor should be the person who bred the puppies, you should be able to meet the parents, they should be healthy, she should be microchipped and wormed, she should have been checked by a vet, she should be well socialised and they should be happy to complete the puppy

Why you shouldn’t buy a dog from a breeder?

Why Some Dog Breeders Should Be Avoided

They pay little or no attention to genetic health issues in both the parents and the puppies. They often charge less money for the puppies than a responsible breeder, but still more money than they should (no one should pay for puppies that were bred carelessly).

How can you tell if someone is a backyard breeder?

10 Signs of a Backyard Breeder

  1. The puppies leave mom before 8 weeks of age.
  2. The breeder doesn’t ask you questions.
  3. The breeder breeds several types of dogs.
  4. The breeder breeds several types of dogs.
  5. The breeder always has puppies available.
  6. The breeder isn’t active in breed specific clubs.
  7. The breeder doesn’t encourage you to stay in contact.

Why are backyard breeders bad?

Inadequate nutrition, fleas and worms are common in these situations, placing the welfare of these animals at risk. Backyard breeding contributes to the unwanted companion animal population in the community. Uncontrolled breeding and overpopulation inevitably leads to the euthanasia of healthy unwanted animals.